Finalists for the 2016 Governor General’s Literary Awards

ggla2016Each year, the Canada Council for the Arts honours the best books in Canadian literature with the Governor General’s Literary Awards. This year, we have two finalists in the Young People’s Literature categories, one in text and one in illustrated books. Congratulations to Trilby Kent and Esmé Shapiro!

Young People’s Literature – Text

Once in a Town Called MothOnce, in a Town Called Moth
Written by Trilby Kent
Hardcover | 224 Pages | Ages 12+
ISBN: 9781101918111
eBook: 9781101918135
“Kent writes with refreshing emotional sophistication.… As literary as it is smart, Kent’s novel reflects life beautifully in its rigorous denial of pat, easy answers.” 
– Starred review, Quill & Quire

Congratulations to the other finalists in this category: Mikaela Everett for The Unquiet, E.K. Johnston for A Thousand Nights, Martine Leavitt for Calvin, and Tim Wynne-Jones for The Emperor of Any Place.

Young People’s Literature – Illustrated Books

OokoOoko
By Esmé Shapiro
Hardcover | 40 Pages | Ages 3-7
ISBN: 9781101918449
eBook: 9781101918456
“Shapiro is onto something here: a hard to define ‘Ooko-ness,’ that is lovely, invigorating and pure.”
Quill & Quire

Congratulations to the other finalists in this category: Jo Ellen Bogart and Sydney Smith for The White Cat and the Monk, Lucy Ruth Cummins for A Hungry Lion or A Dwindling Assortment of Animals, Jon-Erik Lappano and Kellen Hatanaka for Tokyo Digs a Garden, and Mireille Messier and Pierre Pratt for The Branch.

Go online to discover the year’s best books and their authors, illustrators and translators, on the new interactive GG website. Follow the conversation on Twitter through @CanadaCouncil and by using the hashtag #GGbooks. Like the GGs on Facebook for all the latest updates.

The winners of the 2016 Governor General Literary Awards will be announced on Tuesday, October 25, 2016.

The Word on the Street 2016

wots-2016
Hello friends! The Word on the Street is back in Toronto on Sunday, September 25, 2016 at Harbourfront Centre. Come on down for a day of fun and to meet our authors and illustrators. We will be selling books at the Penguin Random House Canada Young Readers tent on Kidstreet (KS11).

yitzi-and-the-giant-menorahYitzi and the Giant Menorah
By Richard Ungar
For ages 5 to 9
Kindergarten to grade 4
1:00 PM to 1:30 PM – Richard will be at the First Book Canada tent to sign copies of Yitzi and the Giant Menorah.

 

who-broke-the-teapotWho Broke the Teapot?!
By Bill Slavin
For ages 3 to 7
Preschool to grade 2
3:00 PM to 3:20 PM – Bill will be at the TD Children’s Literature Stage for a reading and drawing demonstration.

 

Once in a Town Called MothOnce, in a Town Called Moth
By Trilby Kent
For ages 12 and up
Grades 7 and up
3:30 PM to 4:15 PM – Trilby will be at the Teen Spirit Stage for a panel on New Starts for Outcasts.

 

Noni Speaks UpNoni Speaks Up
By Heather Hartt-Sussman
Illustrated by Geneviève Côté
For ages 3 to 7
Preschool to grade 2
3:40 PM to 4:00 PM – Heather will be at the TD Children’s Literature Stage for a reading.

 

Solutions for Cold FeetSolutions for Cold Feet and Other Little Problems
By Carey Sookocheff
For ages 4 to 8
Preschool to grade 3
4:15 PM to 5:00 PM – Carey will be at the Sago Mini Children’s Activity Tent making sock puppies with everyone!

 

downside-upDownside Up
By Richard Scrimger
For ages 10 and up
Grades 5 and up
4:15 PM to 5:00 PM – Richard will be at the Teen Spirit Stage for a panel on Ordinary Teens, Extraordinary Stories.

You’re Invited to the Launch of Once, in a Town Called Moth

MothLaunchPlease join Trilby Kent in celebrating the launch of Once, in a Town Called Moth. Please RSVP to rsvpcanada@penguinrandomhouse.com.

When: Friday, September 16, 2016
Time: 7:00 pm
Where: Type Books
Address: 883 Queen Street West, Toronto, ON

Once in a Town Called MothOnce, in a Town Called Moth
Written by Trilby Kent
Publication Date: September 6, 2016
Hardcover | 224 Pages | Ages 12 and up
ISBN 978-1-10191-811-1

“Kent writes with refreshing emotional sophistication.… As literary as it is smart, Kent’s novel reflects life beautifully in its rigorous denial of pat, easy answers.” – Starred Review, Quill & Quire

“Lyrical writing imbues simple scenes with complex emotional undercurrents…. The motions feel almost casually violent, slyly suggesting untrustworthiness. It’s these descriptions that truly develop the novel’s mystery-laden tension. Truly outstanding literary moments distinguish this quiet search for identity…” – Kirkus Reviews